The building identified as the house of neoplatonic philosopher Proclus was discovered accidentally in 1955, under excavating works for the completion of the new road Dionysiou Areopagitou. The "Building Chi" as it is commonly referred, is a grand mansion of the 5th century A.D., southeast of the Odeon of Herodes Atticus and southwest of the theatre of Dionysus. Detailed research was conducted only in the northern part of it, because the rest is buried under the modern buildings.

The finds from the excavations include a built in small shrine with an embossed relief of Cybele, a votive probably in honor of Asclepius, a fragment of an inscription with perhaps philosophical content, a headless torso of Isis, and also a piglet grave with offerings.

The archaeological findings in conjunction with the location of the building led the director of excavations I. Meliades to correlate the Building Chi with a passage from the Life of Proclus, (Vita Procli) from Marinus, indicating that the home of the philosopher was near-by the temple of Asclepius, the temple and the theatre of Dionysus, and could be seen from the Acropolis. From Marinus we are also informed that Proclus worshipped Isis and Cybele, and had healed a woman praying to Asclepius.

The alleged house of Proclus is a spacious building with a large absidal central hall and side chambers that could be regarded as classrooms, or rooms suitable for private gatherings.

From this building only the labeling of its ground plan can be seen today, which protrudes slightly from the surface of today pedestrian street Dionysiou Areopagitou.

Author: Konstantinos Lazaridis
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