Laws
The Laws is one of Plato's late dialogues. It discusses political and ethical issues.
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Liber de Causis (The Book of Causes)
Anonymous work, written in Arabic entitled/under the title Liber de Bonitate Pura—The Book of Pure Goodness (9th c.) and translated into Latin as The Book of the causes. It is a compilation of proposals of Proclus. It was considered Aristotelian (up to the 13th century) and is a key component...
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Lysis
Socratic dialogue. It discusses the object of love, the dear (φίλον), but it has also been maintained that it discusses friendship or, according to others, Love.
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Menexenus
Menexenus is a Socratic dialogue composed by Plato during his first writing period. It takes up the subject of epideictic rhetoric and in particular funeral orations.
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Meno
The Meno or On virtue, peirastic is a transitional dialogue, considered to lead from the early works, the so-called Socratic dialogues, to Plato’s middle period writings. The philosopher initially brings up the issue of virtue’s teachability, but the main goal in this dialogue turns out...
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Modern Editions of Plato
Rudiments of the critical reception and dissemination of Plato’s works over the past two centuries.
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Parmenides
A late Platonic dialogue on the one-many problem, in which a severe critique is launched against the middle-period version of Plato’s Theory of Forms.
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Phaedo
Phaedo is a platonic dialogue of the so-called middle period. In antiquity it was also known by the title On Soul. The dialogue takes up the subjects of the nature of the soul, immortality and the theory of forms.
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Philebus
This is one of the late Platonic dialogues, also known in antiquity by the subtitle peri hēdonēs, ēthikos (On pleasure, pertaining to ethics). Plato’s stated aim here is the investigation of the nature of the ‘good’, and the relative contribution of pleasure and knowledge to...
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Plato
Dialogue belonging to Plato’s middle period. It discusses justice and the ideal Republic, but it also presents Plato’s main metaphysical and epistemological ideas.
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